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Hairy nevus, where a person has patches of excess hair growth or hirsutism,

Hairy nevus, where a person has patches of excess hair growth or hirsutism,

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Comment by Amr on February 27, 2011 at 11:01am
Hypertrichosis what a strange thing
Comment by Deepak Ghimire on June 24, 2010 at 5:40am
so what is difference with Congenital Hypertrichosis Lanuginosa.................
Comment by Dr Anand Bhandary P on September 19, 2009 at 8:40pm
The congenital nevomelanocytic nevus (CNN), known commonly as the congenital hairy nevus, denotes a pigmented surface lesion present at birth.

Nevomelanocytes, derivatives of melanoblasts, compose the cellular format of the neoplasm.1
Multiple definitions have been used to classify nevi into small, medium, or giant. These include diameter size, total body surface area (TBSA), and ability to excise in one surgical setting.
Based on diameter, CNN are characterized as small (<1.5 cm), medium (1.5-19.5 cm), and large or giant (>20 cm in adolescents and adults or predicted to reach 20 cm by adulthood).2,3
Using the prediction classification, giant nevi have also been described as comprising 9 cm on a child's head and 6 cm on a child's body.4
The potential for large congenital nevi to become malignant is significant and is an important consideration in the treatment and management of this entity.

Multiple studies have attempted to elucidate the cumulative risk of developing cutaneous melanoma in patients born with CNN.

A recent study at the University of Pennsylvania Medical Center reported a 5.7% cumulative 5-year risk of developing a cutaneous melanoma in patients with large or giant CNN.5
A study of the Dutch nationwide pathology database reported a standardized incidence rate of 12.2% of developing melanoma in CNN. This study observed an increase risk of melanoma (in patients with CNN) of 6.4% for men and 14.1% for women when compared to general population rates. Furthermore, patients with giant CNN had an increased risk of 51.6% compared to general population rates.6
For small CNN, risk rates have been reported between 0.8% and 4.9%.
Very large congenital nevi account for less than 0.1% of cutaneous melanomas, whereas small varieties of congenital nevi may account for 15% of cutaneous melanomas.
Malignancy should be suspected with focal growth, pain, bleeding, ulceration, significant pigmentary change, or pruritus.

Management and treatment of patients with CNN depends on the lesion's size, location, and propensity
for malignant transformation.

Aesthetic considerations are important.
Surgical treatment of giant or large CNN is addressed at age 6 months.4,7
Procedures used in surgical treatment include serial excision and reconstruction with skin grafting, tissue expansion, local rotation flaps, and free tissue transfer.8
Adjunctive treatment options include chemical peels, dermabrasion, and laser surgeries.
Surgical excision remains the mainstay of treatment, since other adjunctive treatment options do not fully eradicate the nevus cells.
Cultured epidermal autographs have been used successfully in select cases.9
Management of small lesions includes close monitoring with photographic documentation versus surgical excision.
Comment by R Pravin Kumaar on September 5, 2009 at 6:39am
# Procedures used in surgical treatment include serial excision and reconstruction with skin grafting, tissue expansion, local rotation flaps, and free tissue transfer.
# Adjunctive treatment options include chemical peels, dermabrasion, and laser surgeries.
# Surgical excision remains the mainstay of treatment, since other adjunctive treatment options do not fully eradicate the nevus cells.
# Cultured epidermal autographs have been used successfully in select cases.
Comment by mirunalini on September 4, 2009 at 8:18pm
wat is the treatment for this doctor...
Comment by mirunalini on September 4, 2009 at 8:16pm
oh my....

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